As mentioned in Expo Awards, teams are expected to uphold the Core Values during the entire season, especially at a tournament.  This section details the types of issues and the consequences, as well as the investigative process used by Central Valley Robotics when issues arise at a tournament. 

Types of Core Values Concerns and their Consequences

The list below is broken into two categories: Orange and Red level behaviors. 

Orange Level Concerns

These behaviors are considered minor violations of the Core Values and when observed, are delivered to the Review Advisor for the event for further investigation.  For valid and proven claims, Reviewers or Review Advisor will use records of orange level behaviors when selecting teams for awards.

Examples of Orange Level Concerns

  • Team or Adult Behaviors
    • Hostile or aggressive behavior
    • Disrespect toward others
    • Poor sportsmanship
    • Bullying
    • Inappropriate language or topics of conversation
    • Adult Intervention
      • Team members cannot answer questions or demonstrate understanding of their work. 
      • Adult speaking in review sessions (unless invited or solicited by the reviewers). 

Red Level Concerns

These behaviors are considered major violations of the Core Values and when they are observed they are immediately reported the Judge Advisor for further investigation.  The Judge Advisor will contact Central Valley Robotics as part of the investigation.   For valid and proven reports, the Director of Central Valley Robotics will authorize the offending teams to be disqualified from the event (including all awards) and all Robot Game scores may be zeroed at the discretion of the Head Referee and/or Director of Central Valley Robotics. 

These situations are very rare in this program.  This policy exists in the event an unfortunate situation does occur.  Central Valley Robotics staff will be involved in all reports of Red Level Concerns.     

Examples of Red Level Concerns

  • Team or Adult Behaviors
    • Criminal behavior (stealing, vandalism, physical fights, etc.)
    • Clear evidence of serious bullying or abusive behavior
    • Clear evidence an adult did the work for the team
    • Adult intervention does not stop after a direct warning
    • Clear evidence of cheating or intentionally negatively impacting another team’s experience

The Handling Process

Depending on the severity of the concerns behaviors or choices by a team or its members may lead to a consequence that varies from a warning to a partial or full disqualification.  In rare circumstances, teams will not be considered for any award and the violation will be officially recorded for the event and reported to FIRST as necessary.  Central Valley Robotics does not take this process lightly and has defined a process that is used to help ensure fairness and transparency.  Central Valley Robotics trains our event staff to do their best to try to investigate all reports to help ensure fairness for all teams. 

The Incident Report

Central Valley Robotics has an incident report that will be used to record a Core Values or Challenge Rules incident at official Central Valley Robotics events.  The Event Staff will make every attempt to deliver this report to the team prior to closing ceremonies and deliver a copy to Central Valley Robotics for official records.   The Incident Report represents the final decision on the investigation and cannot be appealed onsite.  Following the event, teams may contact Central Valley Robotics for further discussion on the contents of the Incident Report.  A copy of the Incident Report can be found here: Team Incident Report Public.pdf

  • No labels